Reduce Payroll Tax Expenses with an S-Corp

May 17th, 2017 by Doug Boswell No comments »

Payroll taxes are a large reoccurring expense for most employers. How can they be reduced? Setting up your company as an S-Corp may be your best solution.

As an S-Corp, the owners can take an additional percentage of their payroll-based income as straight disbursements. These disbursement allow you to avoid the employer side of the federal payroll taxes on the disbursed amounts. Speak with your CPA about determining the maximum percentage amount you can legally take.

Other than that, you are stuck with whatever payroll taxes your employees generate. But remember the total payroll tax expenses include each employee’s tax as well as the employer contributions. That number may look large to you, but realized that these employee tax amounts are not your expense, they are part of the compensation to your employees, who are the ones actually paying it. Only the employer side of taxes are a tax expense to your company.

Banking Mistakes to Avoid

October 4th, 2016 by Doug Boswell No comments »

Business owners are so busy working on their business rather than in their business–as they should be–that sometimes your friendly neighborhood banker can end up robbing you blind! The following are four common banking mistakes made by busy small business owners.

Only Banking at One Bank: As a small business owner with 100 things to do, it is easy to settle in with one bank and do all of your banking activity through that one institution. This can have a number of ill side effects. When it comes time for a loan and your bank denies you, if you don’t have a relationship with another bank, you may be out of luck. Secondly, you should make banks compete for your business. Don’t simply give all of your business to one bank by default. Shop around for the best deals.

Failing to Focus on Collateral in Loan Application: When you are submitting a loan application, you may be asked for an executive summary. Make sure that your executive summary focuses on why you are a good risk for the bank. Don’t talk about your exponential growth or potential. Bankers want to know about the facts of your financial situation: your assets, liabilities, and what you can offer as collateral.

Relying Too Much on Line of Credit: If you run your business on a line of credit, as many entrepreneurs do, you may be setting yourself up for disaster if your bank decides to reduce or eliminate your credit line. This happened to many small business owners during the last recession. Try to wean yourself off your line of credit if at all possible.

Carelessness With Bank Fees: Small business owners remember: Cash is king. You must avoid bank fees at all costs. What a careless way to let your money literally vanish into thin air. Don’t get too lax with your banking, even during those busy weeks and months, because when you look back at your bank fees you will realize what a hindrance they can become to your business if they are a recurring issue.

Don’t fall victim to these common banking mistakes. This may mean you need to hire a part-time bookkeeper. Of course there are many, many good reasons to have an expert handle your books, financial reporting and analysis, but at least be prudent in how you use banks.

From Financial Data to Profit & Growth

August 4th, 2016 by Doug Boswell No comments »

Too often business owners are so preoccupied with certain parts of the bookkeeping process that they don’t realize just how valuable their full set of financial data can be; should it be made available to them in an actionable way. Some business owners focus on preparing the yearly tax statement. Others may worry about that and their cash flow. And others might just use it to balance their checkbooks. If you choose to have us do your accounting, we can do all that and more. And most importantly, we can help you become more profitable.

First you need a reputable accountant, what we like to call a Profit and Growth Expert, to determine your business goals. These goals may include, but are not limited to, growth expectations, marketing plans, profit margins, and overall labor expenses. We ask important questions like, what do you want? And why do you want it?

Here is a technical way of looking at bookkeeping:

Bookkeeping: The practice involved in the systematic recording of transactions affecting a company, beginning with the data-entry process and ending with the preparation of financial statements. The art, practice, or labor involved in the systematic recording of the transactions affecting a business.

In layman’s terms, bookkeeping is the practice of determining which numbers are important to you and your business. Once that’s decided, we can set up a customized system that will organize the information you want and need. This is the different between the accounting services provided by a bookkeeper as opposed to a Profit and Growth Expert.

Let my firm, Solid Growth Accounting Services, be that Profit and Growth Expert, and advance you from a business that keeps financial records, to one that uses financial data to determine the best path to successful growth and prosperity.

Solid Growth Accounting Services Wins Another Award!

March 15th, 2016 by Doug Boswell No comments »

Thumbtack Award 2016Solid Growth Accounting Services wins another Best of Award from Thumbtack based on customer reviews. This makes two years in a row. Thanks for the recognition, Thumbtack!

Q: Is it me or is QuickBooks getting harder to use? A: Its you.

February 27th, 2016 by Doug Boswell No comments »

Is it me or is QuickBooks getting harder to useAs a long time QuickBooks professional, I have to ask, “​Is anyone really saying that QB is getting harder to use?”

Everything you have learned over the years is pretty much the same. Sometimes the interface gets modified, but that’s an easy adjustment. You might not even need the newer features, and can almost certainly get by without them if nothing related has changed in your business. And unless to use payroll or other features that require an online interface, you might not ever need to buy the new version. I have clients still using QB 2010.

If you change to QB Online you will find the interface to be very different, but then of course, it’s a different program. None of my clients that made the switch had difficulty adjusting to it, maybe because I toured them through the features they need to use themselves. If you subscribe to one of the low end, less expensive versions, you might burn a lot of time looking for features and reporting that don’t exist. Frankly, it is my option that these limited low-end QBO versions are just a ploy to get you vested in the product. Intuit knows that you will upgrade before long, especially if you need common small business features such as being able to produce 1099s for your contractors.

The difference between finding QB easy or hard to use is all about learning the proper use of the program. Just like everything else you do. If you don’t learn how to use it, it will be hard for you to use properly.

The next issue is that even though you don’t need to be an accountant, it helps a lot to understand accounting/bookkeeping basics. If you don’t, then you will have some degree of difficulty using it, and even worse might be creating a mess out of your books. The best boost in business I ever received was back when Intuit ran advertisements (for many years) with the slogan, “With QuickBooks, you are only a click away from being your own accountant”. Thousands of small business owners believed that, bought QB, and proceeded to make a real mess out of their books.

Even to this day, I rarely take over the bookkeeping of a new client without having to start out by fixing a large amount of problems related to the miss-use of the program, and then proceed to edit their Chart of Accounts to make their QB a better reflection of the actual business and the kind of information the owner needs to make the best possible business decisions. That is the case even when they had a bookkeeper doing the work for them. So many bookkeepers have learned QB, but still don’t know basic accounting or how a business functions. There is a lot more benefit in the proper use of any accounting software than just keeping track of things so you can file tax returns. An awful lot.